Pressure Cooker White Rice

Pressure Cooker White Rice

Pressure Cooker White Rice

Pressure cooker white rice? Why bother?

I made rice on the stove top. Between heating up the pot and letting the pressure naturally release, how would a pressure cooker save time? I might as well simmer for fifteen minutes on the stove in a regular pot.1

Then the kids forgot to clean out my favorite sauce pot, the one I always use to make rice. (It was sitting in the sink, mac and cheese hardening from lunchtime.)2 Everything else was ready for a stir-fry, so instead of scrubbing the pot myself, I pulled out my Instant Pot and set it up.

 

Since that day, my Instant Pot is also my rice cooker. Why? Because now I can make rice while I’m only half paying attention. Fill the pot with rice and water, set it for 4 minutes, lock the lid, and listen for the beep. Then, set a timer for 10 minutes, and when that goes off, quick release any remaining pressure. When I’m busy in the kitchen – tossing my way through that stir fry, for example – it’s good to have a quick and easy side dish.

Recipe: Pressure Cooker White Rice

Equipment

 

Yields 6-8

Pressure Cooker White Rice

Pressure cooker white rice recipe - rice from the pressure cooker in about 20 minutes.

5 minPrep Time

15 minCook Time

20 minTotal Time

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Ingredients

  • 2 cups long grain white rice
  • 2 1/2 cups water
  • 1 teaspoon Diamond Crystal kosher salt or 1/2 teaspoon table salt

Directions

  1. Add the rice to the pot: Pour the rice, water, and salt into the pressure cooker pot and stir.
  2. Pressure cook the rice: Lock the lid and pressure cook on high pressure for 4 minutes. Turn off warming mode and let pressure come down for 10 minutes, then quick release any remaining pressure in the pot. Fluff the rice with a fork and serve.
Cuisine: American | Recipe Type: Pressure Cooker
http://dadcooksdinner.com/2015/10/pressure-cooker-white-rice.html/

PressureCookerBasicWhiteRice-1000315

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Notes

  • No pressure cooker? See my Basic White Rice recipe for traditional pot instructions.
  • You can make this recipe in a stove top pressure cooker if you want, but I don’t think it saves much time or attention when compared to regular stove top rice. The big advantage I get is the set it and forget it nature of the electric pressure cooker.

What do you think?

Questions? Other ideas? Leave them in the comments section below.

Related Posts

Pressure Cooker Red Beans and Rice
Pressure Cooker Risotto with Goad Cheese
Stove Top Basic White Rice

 

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  1. Brown rice is another story. It takes much longer on the stove top, so the pressure cooker has a big time advantage. But that’s a recipe for another day.

  2. The advantage to kids getting older? They can do the dishes! The disadvantage? Sometimes a pot that needs a good scrubbing gets a light sprinkling of water and put in the dish drain.

3 Comments

  1. Dave Gill /

    Yes, please do brown rice. We’re a brown rice house, and an alternative for nights when I hose up the rice cooker programming would be nice.

  2. Patricia /

    I will be 60 next month h and this is the first time in my life I’ve made perfect rice! I love to cook too!! Thank you

  3. Kyle L /

    Great Recipe, Great Site! Thank you for this, and I made this (but I also add in 1 TBSP melted butter…mmmm). It was great! I like to think I can do a number of impressive things in the kitchen, but rice is not one of them – this was spot on! The only thing – when I tried making a half recipe (i.e. one cup of rice, and with a little more water than required, even), I experienced a bit of scorching. Not brown or black, but a good bit of sticking, and a good bit of the rice was somewhat crunchy – anybody else experience this?

    I will say I have tried the actual “Rice” function on this pot, and it seems to work well. It is actually automatic, so you put in the rice and water and select rice, and it just takes over and calculates the time (I presume based upon temperature calculations), and cooks the rice until done, and my results were perfect – and just pushing a button, setting no time, the IP takes care of that for you.

    The only consideration with the automated rice function is that it uses low pressure, not high. There is nothing wrong with this, but it does take longer. I would say this recipe on high pressure has an average cook time of 13-17 minutes, and the low pressure automated rice function adds about 5-6 minutes to that.

    I am just posting this to a.) praise this site!! b.) inquire as to anyone else’s experience with smaller amounts of rice or with the automated rice function, and c.) to suggest that for 2 cups or more, use this recipe, for less than that, consider the automated rice function.

    Cheers